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04 December 2017

Surprise in the Kangaroo Family Tree – An Outsider Is a Close Relative, After All...

17 November 2017

European forests might not be realizing their full potential ...

14 November 2017

Partnertausch als Überlebensstrategie – Flechten passen sich durch Algenwechsel an neues Klima an ...

20 October 2017

Shallow soils promote savannas in South America...

07 September 2017

Rising winter temperatures contributed to the decline of the brown bear in Europe...

03 July 2017

Elevational range limits of alpine trees not solely determined by climate...

30 June 2017

Areas affected by fire are decreasing globally...

13 June 2017

Global hotspots for alien species are island and coastals regions...

31 May 2017

Downsizing in animal communities leads to functional decay in tropical forests...

24 May 2017

Zebras follow their memory when migrating ...

11 May 2017

Picky birds are most flexible...

09 May 2017

Open Day at Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre...

27 April 2017

Auf dem Gipfel der Evolution – Flechten bei der Artbildung zugeschaut...

19 April 2017

Bears breed across species borders...

30 March 2017

Ground water depletion due to international trade threathens food supply world-wide...

27 March 2017

Methan emissions from cows could rise by 70 per cent until 2050...

27 February 2017

New insights into the mechanisms into how ungulates got bigger in the Neogene...

20 February 2017

More warm-dwelling Animals and Plants as a Result of Climate Change ...

15 February 2017

Alien species on the rise worldwide...

02 February 2017

Partnerwahl bei Flechten – Warmes Klima macht wählerisch...

17 January 2017

Spiel mit dem Feuer – wie Eiszeitjäger das Landschaftsbild Europas prägten...

11 January 2017

How far do invasive species travel?...

04 January 2017

Domino effect: The loss of plant species triggers the extinction of animals...

Press Releases

Age Before Youth: Older Cranes Lead the Way to New Migration Patterns

Frankfurt, Germany, 06/09/2016. Whooping cranes are changing migration patterns in response to climate and land use change, and these new patterns are being determined by the older , more experienced,  members of the population. 

Researchers from Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, the Goethe University Frankfurt, the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Maryland, and the International Crane Foundation investigated a behavior known as “shortstopping,” which is the shortening of a migration route by shifting wintering grounds toward the breeding grounds.

Shortstopping can benefit migrating birds by decreasing the amount of energy that they use on long distance flights. They also can arrive at the breeding grounds earlier, which can be beneficial. This requires that the birds find suitable overwintering sites closer to breeding grounds, and due to climate and land use change, suitable sites can now be found at higher latitudes.

“Our results show that when migratory groups winter closer to the breeding grounds, the first groups to use these new sites include older birds. For each additional year of age of the oldest bird in the group, the distance between breeding and wintering grounds was reduced by 40 km, or almost 25 miles,” said Claire Teitelbaum, a Senckenberg & Goethe University Frankfurt researcher, and lead author of the study.  “We also found that site familiarity may be an important factor in where migratory groups short-stop. Older birds often chose overwintering sites which they were familiar with from previous migrations.”

The population studied is a reintroduced population, established by the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership. In 2001, the Partnership began releasing captive-reared birds and teaching them to migrate using ultralight aircraft. The research results show that the shortstopping behavior has been developed by older birds but has then been passed to younger birds: In 2006, no 1-year-old birds shortstopped, but by 2015, 75 percent of them did so.

The more northerly wintering sites that birds are choosing also have particular characteristics. Northerly wintering sites are more likely than southerly sites to be under cultivation, and have also experienced more warming since 1900.  Grain can be an important source of food for cranes, but grain is only available if it isn’t covered by snow. According to the researchers, in this case, it might be that a combination of climate change and land-use change is facilitating changes in species ranges.

“We found that migratory species are able to innovate new migration behaviors, possibly because of their long-term memory and ability to learn from experience,” said Thomas Mueller, a professor at Senckenberg & Goethe University and coauthor of the study. “We also identified two potential external explanations for the changing patterns, which were grain cover as a food source, and temperature changes.”

Shortstopping in this population occurs to a vastly greater degree than in the remnant wild population, which migrates between northern Canada and the Gulf coast of Texas.

“While the availability of grain and warmer temperatures allows birds to survive winters farther north, only the reintroduced population is really taking advantage of that” said Sarah Converse a research ecologist with USGS and a coauthor of the paper.

Converse went on to say “The developing culture of this young population might provide more room for innovations like short-stopping. By contrast, the culture of the remnant population is relatively old, and innovation might be less common. Some populations and species are much more likely to struggle to adapt to climate and land-use change than these Whooping Cranes are.”

Researchers used a 14 year data-set of 175 individual whooping cranes to study what was driving shortstopping in the population.

 Press images

Grus americana

 Whooping crane (Grus americana) @ Ted Thousand

Press images may be used at no cost for editorial reporting, provided that the original author’s name is published, as well. The images may only be passed on to third parties in the context of current reporting.

Contact

Jun. Prof. Dr. Thomas Mueller
Senckenberg Nature Research Society&
Goethe-University Frankfurt
Tel. +49 (0)69- 7542 1889
Thomas.mueller@senckenberg.de

Hannah Hamilton
U.S. Geological Survey
Tel. +1 703-648-4356
hhamilton@usgs.gov

Judith Joerdens
Press officer
Senckenberg Nature Research Society
Tel. +49 (0)69- 7542 1434
pressestelle@senckenberg.de

Publication

Teitelbaum, C.S., Converse, S.J., Fagan,W.F., Böhning-Gaese, K.B., O’Hara, R.B., Lacey, A.E. und Mueller, T. (2016): Experience drives innovation of new migration patterns of whooping cranes in response to global change . Nature Communications, doi: 10.1038/NCOMMS12793

To study and understand nature with its limitless diversity of living creatures and to preserve and manage it in a sustainable fashion as the basis of life for future generations – this has been the goal of the Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung (Senckenberg Nature Research Society) for almost 200 years. This integrative “geobiodiversity research” and the dissemination of research and science are among Senckenberg’s main tasks. Three nature museums in Frankfurt, Görlitz and Dresden display the diversity of life and the earth’s development over millions of years. The Senckenberg Nature Research Society is a member of the Leibniz Association. The Senckenberg Nature Museum in Frankfurt am Main is supported by the City of Frankfurt am Main as well as numerous other partners. Additional information can be found at www.senckenberg.de.

2016 is the Leibniz year. On the occasion of the 370th birthday and the 300-year death anniversary of polymath Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (*7/1/1646 in Leipzig, † 11/14/1716 in Hanover), the Leibniz Association is organizing an extensive topical year. Under the title “The best of all possible worlds” – a Leibniz quote – it brings into focus the diversity and timeliness of the subject matter currently studied by the scientists at the 88 Leibniz institutions across the Federal Republic of Germany.  www.bestewelten.de