2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

14 December 2016

Versteinerter Wasserfloh...

12 December 2016

Darwins Erben machen Fortschritte: Mit DNA-Barcodes zum Stammbaum des Lebens ...

07 December 2016

Paradise Lost? – Loss of large fruit-eating birds threatens tropical forests ...

24 November 2016

German-Tansanian research project seeks to analyse climate and land use changes on Kilimandscharo...

06 October 2016

The great feeding-frenzy: Species-rich food webs produce biomass more efficiently...

28 September 2016

Professor Mulch, SBiK-F, honored by the Geological Society of America...

15 September 2016

For 20 Million Years, the Diversity of Large Terrestrial Mammals Depended on Plant Growth...

08 September 2016

Gene analyses reveal that there are not one, but four giraffe species...

06 September 2016

Age Before Youth: Older Cranes Lead the Way to New Migration Patterns...

18 August 2016

Greater biodiversity in grasslands leads to higher levels of ecosystem services...

20 July 2016

Are forests of the future at risk?...

12 July 2016

Its all so quiet in the genome...of the Tasmanian devil...

28 June 2016

New method helps to reconstruct rainfall thousands of years ago...

16 June 2016

Das Ei, das aus der Kälte kam – Wie sich Tigermücken für den Winter rüsten...

24 May 2016

Frankfurter Biologin wird Mitglied der Nationalen Akademie der Wissenschaften...

18 April 2016

Invasive species - who is next to arrive?...

24 March 2016

Wald in Europa: mehr Arten, mehr Nutzen. Homogenisierung von Wäldern führt zu geringerer Ökosystemleistung...

22 March 2016

Borreliose: Übertragung durch Mückenstich? Einheimische Mücken sind potentielle Vektoren für Lyme-Borreliose...

17 February 2016

Evolution auf Betriebstemperatur. In warmen Regionen entwickeln sich Lebewesen schneller...

16 February 2016

Rheinzufluss mit tropischen Parasiten ...

15 January 2016

Researchers uncover multiple adaptations to temperature in birds and mammals...

Press Releases

Age Before Youth: Older Cranes Lead the Way to New Migration Patterns

Frankfurt, Germany, 06/09/2016. Whooping cranes are changing migration patterns in response to climate and land use change, and these new patterns are being determined by the older , more experienced,  members of the population. 

Researchers from Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, the Goethe University Frankfurt, the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Maryland, and the International Crane Foundation investigated a behavior known as “shortstopping,” which is the shortening of a migration route by shifting wintering grounds toward the breeding grounds.

Shortstopping can benefit migrating birds by decreasing the amount of energy that they use on long distance flights. They also can arrive at the breeding grounds earlier, which can be beneficial. This requires that the birds find suitable overwintering sites closer to breeding grounds, and due to climate and land use change, suitable sites can now be found at higher latitudes.

“Our results show that when migratory groups winter closer to the breeding grounds, the first groups to use these new sites include older birds. For each additional year of age of the oldest bird in the group, the distance between breeding and wintering grounds was reduced by 40 km, or almost 25 miles,” said Claire Teitelbaum, a Senckenberg & Goethe University Frankfurt researcher, and lead author of the study.  “We also found that site familiarity may be an important factor in where migratory groups short-stop. Older birds often chose overwintering sites which they were familiar with from previous migrations.”

The population studied is a reintroduced population, established by the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership. In 2001, the Partnership began releasing captive-reared birds and teaching them to migrate using ultralight aircraft. The research results show that the shortstopping behavior has been developed by older birds but has then been passed to younger birds: In 2006, no 1-year-old birds shortstopped, but by 2015, 75 percent of them did so.

The more northerly wintering sites that birds are choosing also have particular characteristics. Northerly wintering sites are more likely than southerly sites to be under cultivation, and have also experienced more warming since 1900.  Grain can be an important source of food for cranes, but grain is only available if it isn’t covered by snow. According to the researchers, in this case, it might be that a combination of climate change and land-use change is facilitating changes in species ranges.

“We found that migratory species are able to innovate new migration behaviors, possibly because of their long-term memory and ability to learn from experience,” said Thomas Mueller, a professor at Senckenberg & Goethe University and coauthor of the study. “We also identified two potential external explanations for the changing patterns, which were grain cover as a food source, and temperature changes.”

Shortstopping in this population occurs to a vastly greater degree than in the remnant wild population, which migrates between northern Canada and the Gulf coast of Texas.

“While the availability of grain and warmer temperatures allows birds to survive winters farther north, only the reintroduced population is really taking advantage of that” said Sarah Converse a research ecologist with USGS and a coauthor of the paper.

Converse went on to say “The developing culture of this young population might provide more room for innovations like short-stopping. By contrast, the culture of the remnant population is relatively old, and innovation might be less common. Some populations and species are much more likely to struggle to adapt to climate and land-use change than these Whooping Cranes are.”

Researchers used a 14 year data-set of 175 individual whooping cranes to study what was driving shortstopping in the population.

 Press images

Grus americana

 Whooping crane (Grus americana) @ Ted Thousand

Press images may be used at no cost for editorial reporting, provided that the original author’s name is published, as well. The images may only be passed on to third parties in the context of current reporting.

Contact

Jun. Prof. Dr. Thomas Mueller
Senckenberg Nature Research Society&
Goethe-University Frankfurt
Tel. +49 (0)69- 7542 1889
Thomas.mueller@senckenberg.de

Hannah Hamilton
U.S. Geological Survey
Tel. +1 703-648-4356
hhamilton@usgs.gov

Judith Joerdens
Press officer
Senckenberg Nature Research Society
Tel. +49 (0)69- 7542 1434
pressestelle@senckenberg.de

Publication

Teitelbaum, C.S., Converse, S.J., Fagan,W.F., Böhning-Gaese, K.B., O’Hara, R.B., Lacey, A.E. und Mueller, T. (2016): Experience drives innovation of new migration patterns of whooping cranes in response to global change . Nature Communications, doi: 10.1038/NCOMMS12793

To study and understand nature with its limitless diversity of living creatures and to preserve and manage it in a sustainable fashion as the basis of life for future generations – this has been the goal of the Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung (Senckenberg Nature Research Society) for almost 200 years. This integrative “geobiodiversity research” and the dissemination of research and science are among Senckenberg’s main tasks. Three nature museums in Frankfurt, Görlitz and Dresden display the diversity of life and the earth’s development over millions of years. The Senckenberg Nature Research Society is a member of the Leibniz Association. The Senckenberg Nature Museum in Frankfurt am Main is supported by the City of Frankfurt am Main as well as numerous other partners. Additional information can be found at www.senckenberg.de.

2016 is the Leibniz year. On the occasion of the 370th birthday and the 300-year death anniversary of polymath Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (*7/1/1646 in Leipzig, † 11/14/1716 in Hanover), the Leibniz Association is organizing an extensive topical year. Under the title “The best of all possible worlds” – a Leibniz quote – it brings into focus the diversity and timeliness of the subject matter currently studied by the scientists at the 88 Leibniz institutions across the Federal Republic of Germany.  www.bestewelten.de