2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

04 December 2017

Surprise in the Kangaroo Family Tree – An Outsider Is a Close Relative, After All...

17 November 2017

European forests might not be realizing their full potential ...

14 November 2017

Partnertausch als Überlebensstrategie – Flechten passen sich durch Algenwechsel an neues Klima an ...

20 October 2017

Shallow soils promote savannas in South America...

07 September 2017

Rising winter temperatures contributed to the decline of the brown bear in Europe...

03 July 2017

Elevational range limits of alpine trees not solely determined by climate...

30 June 2017

Areas affected by fire are decreasing globally...

13 June 2017

Global hotspots for alien species are island and coastals regions...

31 May 2017

Downsizing in animal communities leads to functional decay in tropical forests...

24 May 2017

Zebras follow their memory when migrating ...

11 May 2017

Picky birds are most flexible...

09 May 2017

Open Day at Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre...

27 April 2017

Auf dem Gipfel der Evolution – Flechten bei der Artbildung zugeschaut...

19 April 2017

Bears breed across species borders...

30 March 2017

Ground water depletion due to international trade threathens food supply world-wide...

27 March 2017

Methan emissions from cows could rise by 70 per cent until 2050...

27 February 2017

New insights into the mechanisms into how ungulates got bigger in the Neogene...

20 February 2017

More warm-dwelling Animals and Plants as a Result of Climate Change ...

15 February 2017

Alien species on the rise worldwide...

02 February 2017

Partnerwahl bei Flechten – Warmes Klima macht wählerisch...

17 January 2017

Spiel mit dem Feuer – wie Eiszeitjäger das Landschaftsbild Europas prägten...

11 January 2017

How far do invasive species travel?...

04 January 2017

Domino effect: The loss of plant species triggers the extinction of animals...

Press Releases

How far do invasive species travel?

Frankfurt, Germany, 11th January 2017. Around the globe, an increasing number of plant and animal species are introduced into new regions through human activity. However, the global patterns of their distribution are only poorly understood to date. Researchers at the Senckenberg and at the universities of Oldenburg and Vienna have now discovered that the spread of species can be convincingly explained by a combination of global trade flows and the species’ original distribution. And, contrary to previous assumptions, the spread basically follows very simple laws.

As a result of the globalization of trade and transport, in the past decades, tens of thousands of species have spread into regions where they were not originally at home. Potentially serious consequences of this include the displacement or extinction of native species and the spread of health risks. Even though trade flows are known to represent an important path for the introduction of invasive species, this fact alone is not enough to explain the observed distribution patterns of species.

Scientists from Germany and Austria have examined the global spread of 1,380 exotic animal and plant species under consideration of the trade flows. “A clear pattern is apparent. A particularly large number of species originates in areas that are located at a distance of approximately 10,000 kilometers from the place of introduction. Contrary to this, the majority of the imported goods come from the immediate neighboring countries,” explains Dr. Hanno Seebens of the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Center.

In order to study this apparent contradiction, the team developed a computer model that combines the international trade flows with the species’ worldwide distribution. The model shows that short distances of less than 3,000 kilometers primarily serve the transport of species that already occur in the target country. On the other hand, non-native species are usually introduced over comparatively much longer distances.

Here, the global patterns of the species’ spread closely mirror the global trade flows. However, this only holds true when a species conquers new ground for the first time. Once an exotic species has gained a foothold outside its region of origin, it can also spread to new areas over short distances. 

The manner in which these ‘new settlers’ spread to new areas differs between various groups of plants and animals. Mammals, reptiles and fishes, in particular, often spread over rather short distances (3,000 kilometers). Plants and birds tend to invade regions at a much greater distance

“The spread of non-native species is a complex process, and the data situation is far from complete. Therefore, it is even more astonishing that the spread can be explained with simple models,” says Prof. Dr. Bernd Blasius of the Institute for Marine Chemistry and Biology (ICBM) at the University of Oldenburg. “This gives us reason to hope that in the future, the introduction of exotic species can be better understood and more efficiently contained with the aid of such models.” 

Press Images

Fallopia Essl

The orange day-lily is an alien species in Central Europe and was introduced over a distance of around 10,000 km from East Asia. Copyright: Franz Essl, University of Vienna

Acer Negundo Essl

The green ash is alien to Europe and originates from North America, 10,000 km apart. Copyright: Franz Essl, University of Vienna

Contact

Dr. Hanno Seebens
Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre
Phone +49 (0)69 7542 1874
hanno.seebens@senckenberg.de

Sabine Wendler
Press officer
Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre
Phone +49 (0)69- 7542 1818
pressestelle@senckenberg.de

Publication

Seebens, H., Essl, F. and Blasius B. (2016): The intermediate distance hypothesis of biological invasions. Ecology Letters, doi: 10.1111/ele.12715

Press images may be used at no cost for editorial reporting, provided that the original author’s name is published, as well. The images may only be passed on to third parties in the context of current reporting.

 To study and understand nature with its limitless diversity of living creatures and to preserve and manage it in a sustainable fashion as the basis of life for future generations – this has been the goal of the Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung (Senckenberg Nature Research Society) for 200 years. This integrative “geobiodiversity research” and the dissemination of research and science are among Senckenberg’s main tasks. Three nature museums in Frankfurt, Görlitz and Dresden display the diversity of life and the earth’s development over millions of years. The Senckenberg Nature Research Society is a member of the Leibniz Association. The Senckenberg Nature Museum in Frankfurt am Main is supported by the City of Frankfurt am Main as well as numerous other partners. Additional information can be found at www.senckenberg.de.

download PDF, 260 KB